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Great Rivers Imaging

Midwest travel and interesting places

River Chateau

This is a view of the St. Louis skyline from the deck of the Chain of Rocks Bridge. In addition to the buildings, you can see the St. Louis Arch. The little French Chateau building in the foreground is actually the water intake for the St. Louis water supply and is actually quite large and is really two stories tall.

Next to this structure is another intake that looks like a small castle.

Japanese Garden

A scenic overlook at the Missouri Botanical Garden. This is one of the great attractions in the St. Louis area.

The Missouri Botanical Garden opened to the public in 1859 and began to grow in the European tradition of horticultural display combined with education and the search for new knowledge. Today, 158 years after opening, the Missouri Botanical Garden is a National Historic Landmark and a center for science and conservation, education and horticultural display.

The is a great place for photographers. There are endless opportunities for amazing photos. And the each season everything changes and it is time to go back!

The Climatron

Built in 1960, the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Climatron is an a very remarkable architectural structure. Used as a tropical greenhouse, it is a geodesic dome with no structural support inside.

Floating in the reflecting pool are Chihuly glass objects. Chihuly had a display of his artwork in the Gardens and after the show, these were left for permanent display.

 

Lilies

Jewel Box

Forest Park’s Jewel Box green house has three reflection pools which are filled with various types of lilies like these. The whole area was buzzing with Dragonflies so capturing on in a photo like this was not very difficult. I have been visiting this landmark for 65 years and in never ceases to be interesting.

By the way, I used a 55 to 300mm Nikkor lens to get closeup to the flowers.

Jewel Box

There are a lot of cool things in Forest Park and this is one. The Jewel Box was dedicated Nov. 14, 1936 and cost about $117,000, with about 45 percent coming from Public Works Administration (WPA) funds. It was designed by city engineer William C. E. Becker and Robert Paulus Construction Co. was the contractor.

With its unconventional, cantilevered, vertical glass walls rising majestically 50 feet high, the Jewel Box opened in 1936 to national acclaim. The Post-Dispatch called the Art Deco-style structure, “the latest word in display greenhouses.”

This is a three shot HDR photo. See more Forest Park photos: https://greatrivers.smugmug.com/Galleries/Forest-Park/

River City

Riverfront Photoshoot

A helicopter view of St. Louis as it sits on the Mississippi River. In this view are landmarks such as the Gateway Arch and historic Eads Bridge.

The city of St. Louis was founded in 1764 by French fur traders Pierre Laclède and Auguste Chouteau, and named after Louis IX of France. In 1764, following France’s defeat in the Seven Years’ War, the area was ceded to Spain and retroceded back to France in 1800. In 1803, the United States acquired the territory as part of the Louisiana Purchase. During the 19th century, St. Louis became a major port on the Mississippi River; at the time of the 1870, Census it was the fourth-largest city in the country. It separated from St. Louis County in 1877, becoming an independent city and limiting its own political boundaries. In 1904, it hosted the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and the Summer Olympics.

The original village sat where the Arch grounds are now.

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