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Great Rivers Imaging

Ideas for places to visit in the Midwest

Minocqua Boathouses

It may have been the railroad that brought the first tourists to the island city of Minocqua in the early 1900s, but it’s the boats that keep them coming back. Whether it’s a fishing adventure, a run on the boards (water skis, In Northwoods parlance), or a sunset cruise with refreshments, visitors expect to get out on the water when they head north.

The classic Northwoods version is known as a “wet” boathouse, because it’s built out over the water, allowing boats to be driven into the shelter of its walls. There are a dozen or more of the scenic building lining the shore of Lake Minocqua. The town of Minocqua is an island on the lake so that you can take it all in.

Confluence

Sunflowers at Columbia Bottoms Conservation Area. This is at the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers.  The Conservation Department is managing Columbia Bottom to create a mosaic of bottomland habitats that includes shallow wetlands, bottomland hardwoods, prairie, and cropland. These habitats attract a wide variety of resident and migratory wildlife for the enjoyment of all of our state’s residents and visitors.

Bond Falls After the Storm

Bond Falls

Bond Falls is in the western U.P. on Bond Falls Rd, east of Pauding MI. This is the most impressive waterfall in Michigan with the possible exception of Tahquamenon Falls. The main drop is 40 feet high and 100+ feet wide. Above the main falls are a series of cascades and rapids that must drop a total of 20 feet.

While this is Michigan, the Falls make a nice day trip from Minocqua or Manitowish Waters , Wisconsin.

Near-by Paulding is an unincorporated community along U.S. Route 45, 13.5 miles southeast of the village of Ontonagon. They are famous for the Paulding Light, part of the area’s folklore, which is visible in a valley near-by.

In addition to being very picturesque, this is a very popular waterfall, and unless you visit early in the morning or in winter, you are going to have a lot of company.

Sandy Creek Bridge

Sandy Creek Covered Bridge

Sandy Creek Covered Bridge boasts the picture-perfect appearance of an old red barn. It was one of six bridges built in 1872 to allow passage from the Jefferson County seat of Hillsboro to St. Louis. John H. Morse built Sandy Creek Covered Bridge using the Howe-truss design, named for William Howe. Howe patented his design in 1840, which featured the use of vertical rods to draw wooden members tight against the top and bottom of the bridge. Three of the four remaining covered bridges in Missouri were built using the Howe-truss design, including Sandy Creek, Burfordville and Locust Creek covered bridges.

Chaumette

Chaumette is one of Missouri’s many  wonderful wineries. They have a nice selection of their own wines in addition to a great kitchen serving lunch and dinners. Sit on their porch for an unending view of the Ozarks low rolling hills. If you do not want to drive home after a nice dinner, stay in one of their modern villas.

 

St. Louis Art Museum

Forest Park

One of St. Louis’ top cultural attractions is their art museum. Here is the museum with St. Louis’ namesake, King Louis IX, looking over Forest Park’s Grand Basin. Louis IX, commonly known as Saint Louis or Louis the Saint, is the only King of France to be canonized in the Catholic Church. Louis was crowned in Reims at the age of 12, following the death of his father Louis VIII; his mother, Blanche of Castile, ruled the kingdom as regent until he reached maturity.

The Saint Louis Art Museum is one of the principal U.S. art museums, with paintings, sculptures, cultural objects, and ancient masterpieces from all corners of the world. Its three-story building stands in Forest Park in St. Louis, Missouri, where it is visited by up to a half million people every year.

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